Tag Archives: history

Number 5: Eight fun facts about Camberwell Sunday Market

Kylie’s Hot Pants

Kylie Minogue’s ‘gay husband,’ long-time friend and stylist William Baker, is said to have picked up the infamous gold hot pants from the Camberwell Market for 50 pence. The hot pants became one of Kylie’s most iconic looks after she wore them in the music video for ‘Spinning Around’ in 2000. Kylie Minogue is originally from Camberwell, so this rumour could very well be true.

Since 1976, the weekly market has been luring patrons with vintage trinkets, knickknacks, and hot jam donuts. Founded by Balwyn Rotary, the market started with 48 stalls, and it has since grown to almost 400, with stallholders waiting weeks to secure a spot at the market. Treasure hunters can comb through second-hand clothes and records, antique toys, jewellery, artwork, keepsakes and a variety odds and ends from dawn until midday in search of rare gems. We will be posting eight facts about the Camberwell Sunday Market over this weekend! Stay tuned, more fun facts to come!

Originally posted in The Culture Trip theculturetrip.com by Monique La Terra.

NUMBER 5: EIGHT FUN FACTS ABOUT OUR 40TH ANNIVERSARY

Kylie’s Hot Pants

Kylie Minogue’s ‘gay husband,’ long-time friend and stylist William Baker, is said to have picked up the infamous gold hot pants from the Camberwell Market for 50 pence. The hot pants became one of Kylie’s most iconic looks after she wore them in the music video for ‘Spinning Around’ in 2000. Kylie Minogue is originally from Camberwell, so this rumour could very well be true.

On Sunday, August 28th, the Camberwell Market celebrated its 40th anniversary. Since 1976, the weekly market has been luring patrons with vintage trinkets, knickknacks, and hot jam donuts. Founded by Balwyn Rotary, the market started with 48 stalls, and it has since grown to almost 400, with stallholders waiting weeks to secure a spot at the market. Treasure hunters can comb through second-hand clothes and records, antique toys, jewellery, artwork, keepsakes and a variety odds and ends from dawn until midday in search of rare gems. In celebration of this milestone, here are eight facts about the Camberwell Market.
More facts to come! Originally posted in The Culture Trip theculturetrip.com by Monique La Terra.

Looking back over 40 years

As our 40th Anniversary approaches, more and more people are coming forward with their special memories and stories of the market: amazing discoveries and life changing events.

Yes, life changing events! For example, a couple that was married 15 years ago at the Market are planning to make the trip to Market this weekend.

Just this week a local family was clearing a room and came across a bunch of photographs from 1986. We we just a youngster then, a mere 10 years old.
Now the photos, taken by Ivan Narandja whilst a media student at Rusden College. Are themselves three decades old.

 

The original photos, in framed large format, will be on display at the Rotary Stall tomorrow at the Market and are available for sale.

What do see in these photos that peaked your interest? Leave a comment below.

For us, it’s the more things change, the more they stay the same! Apart from being three decades old and in black & white, these could well have been taken last weekend!

Share your special Market memories with us


Thanks for coming today and also see you on Sunday 28 August: Camberwell Market is celebrating 40 years as one of Australia’s most popular and iconic second-hand, antique, handmade and vintage markets!

🇬🇧🏺⚔💈⚱🔧🇺🇸🕰📟🎙⏱⛩⚓️👢👠🎩🇦🇺

Regular stallholders and visitors are being encouraged to share their stories and experiences in the lead up to this incredible milestone.

For more information, please email maddie@zillaandbrook.com.au

One little invoice

Danks InvoiceIn October 1895, 120 years ago, John Danks & Son, of 391 Bourke Street, Melbourne, invoiced the Richmond Council for work repairing a fire hydrant in Richmond. Melbourne had become one of the most modern cities in world, with grand public buildings and infrastructure, it seemed the envy of the world having grown on the back of the great Victorian gold discoveries of the 1850’s.

In 1880 the cosmopolitan city successfully hosted the Melbourne International Exhibition and in 1888 the Melbourne Centennial Exhibition, commemorating European settlement just 100 years earlier in 1788. By 1895 Melbourne had grown and was more modern than most European Capitals.

In five years the city would become the temporary capital of the world’s newest nation, the Commonwealth of Australia. Australia’s first parliament was opened in the Royal Exhibition Building and continued to sit in Victoria’s State Parliament for over a quarter of a century.

The Camberwell Town Hall just a few years old in 1895 and also symbolic of the grandeur and wealth of the new Colony and soon to be Federation. Steam engines powered transport, industry and helped build the prosperity reflected in the mansions and public buildings of the time.

In October 1895, an accounts clerk at Danks in Bourke Street quickly wrote out one month end account to Richmond Council n the decorative debit note, still bearing the medallions of the Colony’s success. But perhaps a little concerned, that October has been unseasonably dry and the drought had spread southward from the Colony of New South Wales. By November many wheat crops had failed and it was the beginning of what would become known as the Federation Drought.

Then one Sunday, 120 years later, a collector with an interest in old documents came across a stall holder selling several dozen old documents from Richmond Council. There was one in particular that caught his eye, from 1895, for a fire hydrant repair: it captured the essence of the period in Melbourne, steam, grand exhibitions, a little piece of paper that in a folder, in a box, on a table, of a stall holder at Rotary’s Camberwell Sunday Market.

That Bourke Street clerk at Danks could never have known, the invoice that was hurriedly filled out, would last more than a century before it re-appeared at our Market to be featured in an article by one of Australia’s biggest accounting software providers.

But that is what Camberwell Sunday Market is all about – who knows what you will discover.

You can read more about the invoice here: MYOB